Monday, March 21, 2011

ON BOOKS ~ Read, Review, Rehash...



This past Friday we gathered for our monthly Bumble Town Chat and dished about favorite quirky reads amongst other amusing topics. For instance, did you know that duct tape is said to be a good way to remove warts? See - these are the kinds of things you are missing out on each month in our chats ;0)

Each month, someone new stops by to test the waters and see how they like it. This month's newbie was none other than Lin of Duck & Wheel With String. Lin is a funny lady, people. She lives in the Chicago 'burbs with her lively family and entertaining cats, beloved frog pond and works on the fun side of the office with her great pallies, showing off her crafting skills with office supplies. In order to properly welcome Lin we tasked her with determining the topic for our April chat and here is what she came up with.

We are going to read Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford. Then we are going to review it on our blogs. And then we are going to discuss our thoughts together on Friday, 04/22 at 8:30PM ET back in the Bumble Town Chat room. Anyone who wants to join in on this reading event is welcome!

How did Lin come to nominate this particular book? By using one of the best resources out there - her mom. If Lin's mom says it is a goodie, who are we to argue? I'm familiar with the title myself and have had it on my watch list:

"In the opening pages of Jamie Ford's stunning debut novel, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, Henry Lee comes upon a crowd gathered outside the Panama Hotel, once the gateway to Seattle's Japantown. It has been boarded up for decades, but now the new owner has made an incredible discovery: the belongings of Japanese families, left when they were rounded up and sent to internment camps during World War II. As Henry looks on, the owner opens a Japanese parasol..." (taken from Goodreads Summary)

If you've reviewed this book in the past, add your link to the dedicated page HERE. If you're planning to read, review and rehash with the rest of us now, stop by and add your review link whenever you've got it written. You certainly don't have to write a review either. You can just read and come by to talk about it on 04/22 if you prefer.

I am looking forward to a change of pace in my reading. I have spent the first part of this year reading The Count of Monte Cristo - you can read my thoughts on this Classic at Quirky Girls Read - you might be surprised by what I have to say. Having such a different setting and style to read now is going to be fun. I hope you'll join us!

6 comments:

Lin said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lynn said...

Thank you, Molly and Lin, for telling us about this book. This is the first I'd heard of it and I just ordered it from our library :) I went with a friend just last week to the Japanese-American museum near us -- it is all about the Japanese from the San Jose (Calif.) area who were interned during WWII. It was fascinating. They even had a re-created barracks like the housing the interns lived in. Our tour guide had been interned in a camp from ages 10 to 14. Riveting stuff. Thanks again for pointing us to this book. Can't wait to read it.

Margot said...

I tried to order the book from my local library but I discovered I would be #93!! I'll find my own copy. I'm really looking forward to reading this book. I'd love to see the Japanese museum mentioned by Lynn. I'll see if I can find out where that is.

Lynn said...

Margot, it's called the Japanese American Museum and it's in San Jose, Calif. It's a small museum but only $5 admission, and well worth it. Very educational.

Kathleen said...

When I got married all those years ago I had a nice Southern lady I worked with who bought me a beautiful basket filled with duct tape for my wedding shower. I'm sure the wart removal thing was one of the hundreds she told me about when she presented me with the gift!

jehara said...

I'm looking forward to reading this. The duct tape conversation was fun and amusing. It really can be used for practically anything.